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Honduras Fincona La Laja, Natural

Regular price
$19.00
Sale price
$19.00
Regular price
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Unit price
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Cherry, dark chocolate and raisin
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COFFEE PROFILE

This Natural Typica lot has profound, sweet fruit notes like cherry and raisin, as well as a dark confectionery note similar to baking chocolate.    

TASTES LIKE cherry, dark chocolate and raisin
ROAST Espresso

SOURCING

Producer José Mancia inherited the Fincona farm from his father, continuing a tradition that began when José was only a small child. Although coffee production is a difficult world, he attributes the support of his wife, the sales they are making, and the expansion of the area as reasons to motivate him to continue the family legacy of the farm.

To process this coffee, a Natural Typica lot, José and his team sort and depulp it on the same day, before aerobically fermenting it for 24 hours in sealed sacks. It is then washed and moved to the solar dryer where it dries for 25 days. During this process, José counts on up to 20 people to help him.

Coffees from Honduras often receive a bad reputation – however, they can be amazing when grown in the right conditions and processed well, and often have more complexity, depth and richness than other Central American coffees. While regions such as Santa Barbara are renowned for their complex coffees, resulting from slower ripening periods, José’s coffee from Intibuca stood out to us as an example of the enormous quality, and potential of lesser-celebrated regions.


PRODUCER José Mancia
REGION San Juanillo, Intibuca
VARIETAL Typica
PROCESS Natural
ALTITUDE 1800 masl
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Origin

San Juanillo, Intibuca, Honduras

Honduras is a coffee paradox: on one hand it produces a large volume of coffee, and most of it is decent to very good coffee. However, it is often less celebrated than other coffee-producing Central American countries (such as Panama), meaning turbulent prices and an uncertain future for the next generation of coffee producers.

Coffee arrived in Honduras on trading ships in the 18th century. While some small-scale farmers were growing coffee as a minor cash crop early on, banana remained the main cash crop in Honduras throughout the 19th century and into the beginning of the 20th. It was not until the late 20th century that widespread and more intensive coffee farming began. 

Honduras has everything it needs to become a premier specialty coffee producer, if not of one the best in the world. The country has the right growing conditions, abundant fertile soils, soaring altitudes and a variety of different microclimates. The rise of specialty-focused exporters, increased volumes of certified coffees and the strengthening cooperative movement all have worked in tandem to make Honduran coffee ‘one to watch’ in the future.

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